Simon Lazarus

Simon Lazarus is a lawyer, former White House domestic policy staffer for President Jimmy Carter, and a writer on the Supreme Court’s handling of legal checks on corporate power and other legal issues. 

Recent Articles

The Supreme Court Case That Could ‘Overturn the Heart of the New Deal’

And though the Court will rule before July, hardly anyone has noticed it.

AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File
AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File Labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York A s the Supreme Court gets back to work this Friday, January 5, media coverage of its potentially momentous 2017-2018 term has focused on several high-profile cases that deal with gerrymandering, cell phone privacy, religiously cloaked anti-gay discrimination, and the future of public-employee unions. But one sleeper has received less attention than it deserves. Argued on October 2, this case could strip foundational safeguards in place for over 80 years, essential to ensuring millions of low-wage and non-union workers of their right to fair pay, job security, workplace safety, nondiscrimination, and other guarantees protected by state and federal law. The case gives the Roberts Court, with its newly reconstituted 5-4 conservative majority, a chance to escalate its pro-corporate activism to levels unmatched even by the famously anti-regulatory pre-New Deal Court of a century ago. If...

Don’t Just Whack Wells Fargo’s CEO

Target his highest enabler: The Supreme Court.

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf, is sworn in before testifying at a Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing in Dirksen Building, September 20, 2016, on the company's unauthorized accounts opened under customers' names. T oo-big-to-fail Wells Fargo, with its too-big-to-whitewash scheme of charging customers for two million bogus accounts, has done something consumer champions have seldom accomplished on their own: showing ordinary Americans that even the most respected big corporations can opt for blatant, systematic cheating if their leaders believe they can get away with it. Even the banking industry’s most reliable defenders, the Republicans on the Senate Banking and House Financial Services committees, joined their Democratic colleagues in pillorying Wells Fargo’s affably defiant CEO, John Stumpf. On October 12, two weeks after the committee hearings ended, the members got their man. Wells Fargo announced that it had accepted Stumpf’s...

How the Sotomayor Saga Could Help Progressives Take Back the Courts

Sotomayor's hearings shelved the stereotype that progressive judges rule based on their hearts and treat the Constitution as a play toy.

As Supreme Court experts rarely fail to point out, Sonia Sotomayor's accession to the Supreme Court this week will do little to shift future outcomes in hot button cases, because she will likely vote as did her predecessor, center-left Justice David Souter. Nevertheless, the confirmation ritual she has just completed could ultimately turn out to be a substantial plus for progressives. Her performance, and even more, statements by senators, especially Judiciary Committee Chair Patrick Leahy, could reposition progressives on and off the Court with a new vision that spotlights the Roberts Court's appetite for judicial supremacy and reactionary outcomes -- "unabashed law-making," as Justice John Paul Stevens recently put it. Judge Sotomayor's stolid repetition that judges single-mindedly apply the law to the facts, case by case, shelved the stereotype that progressive judges rule based on their hearts and treat the Constitution as a play toy. But, disappointing to many observers,...

The Next War Over the Courts

Conservatives are already fired up about Obama's judicial nominations. Is the White House prepared for the fight?

Supreme Court Justices John Roberts, Clarence Thomas, Stephen Breyer, and Samuel Alito attend the State of the Union address in 2006. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
On March 17, President Barack Obama announced his first judicial nominee: David Hamilton, a 15-year veteran Indiana federal trial judge with the declared support of both Indiana senators, Republican Richard Lugar and Democrat Evan Bayh. With his selection of Hamilton for the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, Obama fulfilled a promise he reportedly made to Republicans. The previous month, ranking Judiciary Committee Republican Arlen Specter told Roll Call that the president had assured him that he would send up nominees "who can get Republican support" and "be acceptable to all sides." Hamilton is by all accounts a great pick. A brilliant young judge respected on both sides of the political aisle, his nomination was endorsed by liberal advocacy groups like People for the American Way but also by the president of the Indianapolis lawyers chapter of the Federalist Society, Geoffrey Slaughter, who rated him "an excellent jurist" whose "judicial philosophy is left of center, but well within...

Will Congress Rebuff the Supreme Court's Anti-Consumer Activism?

The Court's campaign against individual court enforcement of consumer, employee, retiree, and other statutory protections has been a secret hiding in plain sight for the last four decades. Congress is finally taking notice.

The fractious finish of the Supreme Court's 2007-2008 term, coupled with new rumblings on Capitol Hill and the prospect of expanded Democratic gains in November, suggest that we could be at the brink of an epochal clash between the Court and the elective branches of government. Today, Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Patrick Leahy will hold the second in a planned series of hearings designed, as he stated in opening the first hearing, on June 11, "to shine a light on how the Supreme Court's decisions affect Americans' everyday lives." Noting that, especially in today's distressed economy, citizens are preoccupied with health care coverage, retirement uncertainty, and credit card, home mortgage, and other monthly payments, Leahy observed, "Congress has passed laws to protect Americans in these areas, but in many cases, the Supreme Court has ignored the intent of Congress." The Court's campaign against individual court enforcement of consumer, employee, retiree, and other statutory...