Harold Meyerson

Harold Meyerson is the executive editor of The American ProspectHis email is hmeyerson@prospect.org.

Recent Articles

Exclusive: Donald Jr. to Resign as Trump’s Son

(Photo: Albin Lohr-Jones/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images)
(Photo: Albin Lohr-Jones/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images) Donald Trump Jr. F acing a rising chorus of allegations of law-breaking and even treason, Donald Trump Jr. will announce today that he is resigning his position as the president’s son. In a draft of a letter to be released “imminently or soon, whichever comes first,” Trump wrote: When Americans elected Dad as their president and the Trumps as their government (with the largest majority in American history if not more), they entrusted all of us—Eric, Ivanka, Tiffany, Barron, Melania, Jared, me, maybe two or three of those Russian girls (I’ve never been entirely sure)—with putting them, Americans, first (or at least, right behind us). That’s what we’ve all tried to do—Jared in the Middle East and Arabia and Israel, Ivanka in the parts of factories and coal mines set aside for the “paid leave workers” (the parts with slower assembly lines or in the mines, not down so deep), and me with Russia—with our friends in Russia, the...

A Modest Proposal for Mitch McConnell

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, joined by Senator John Barrasso, left, tells reporters he is delaying a vote on the Republican health care bill while GOP leadership works toward getting enough votes, at the Capitol. M itch McConnell’s epic bamboozling failed to persuade a sufficient number of his Republican colleagues, so the Senate vote on his bill to repeal Obamacare, decimate Medicaid, and cut taxes on the rich has been put on hold. The final stake, however, has not yet been driven through its cankered heart. Both the House and Senate versions of the ACA repeal are almost without precedent in American history. By taking away health coverage from more than 20 million Americans, these bills tread new ground: The withdrawal of life-saving services from tens of millions of citizens is something that no previous Congress has ever seriously considered. The closest analogy I can come up with is the Fugitive Slave Act, passed in 1850, which required...

Leader of the Unfree World

AP Photo/Evan Vucci
AP Photo/Evan Vucci President Donald Trump speaks to U.S. military troops and their families at Naval Air Station Sigonella in Italy. H e’s cool with the Saudis, he’s down with Duterte, he’s effectively a Putin pal. With Western Europe, not so much. It may be a fool’s errand to try to discern an actual foreign policy from President Donald Trump’s tweets, pronouncements, phone calls to foreign leaders, and encounters with them on his recent jaunt through the Middle East and Europe. But after so many tweets and phone calls and pronouncements and encounters, we’re obligated to try. When we do, three distinct tendencies emerge. The first is an economic nationalism that ranges from reasonable and long overdue to just plain cockeyed. The one commendable part of Trump’s foreign policy is his elevation, if largely rhetorical, of the interests of American workers (to be sure, chiefly white male workers in manufacturing) over the economic interests of other nations (which are often really the...

Why Do Billionaires Care So Much About Charter Schools?

For the 1 percent, combating inequality is all about individual achievement, not systemic change.

AP Photo/Richard Vogel
AP Photo/Richard Vogel,File Eli Broad poses for a photo at his new museum called "The Broad" in downtown Los Angeles. This article originally appeared at The Los Angeles Times . Subscribe here . T he billionaires, apparently, we shall always have with us—even when we decide how to run the state-funded schools where they rarely send their own kids. In the Los Angeles school board elections earlier this month, a number of billionaires, including Eli Broad , Netflix founder Reed Hastings, and two Walton family siblings, poured millions into the campaigns of two charter-school advocates. These billionaire-sponsored candidates defeated two badly outspent opponents who took a more cautionary stance on expanding charters, lest they decimate the school district’s budget. In total, pro-charter groups outspent teacher unions, $9.7 million to $5.2 million. (In the 2016 state legislative campaigns, the charterizers outspent the unions by a far larger margin, $20.5 million to $1.2 million.) Though...

Pages